postheadericon Senators Demand Crackdown onthe Government-Pharmaceutical Industry ‘Revolving Door’

A few weeks ago, seven democratic senatorslaunched legislation meant to slow down the “revolving door” between majorpharmaceutical firms and federal bureauslike the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) thatcontrol them.This means trouble for the industry giants while startups are still struggling to get high risk Nutraceutical Merchant Accounts due to the risky nature of the pharmaceutical industry.

Senator Tammy Baldwin, the sponsor of the bill said that the pharmaceutical industryhas a deep-seated and strong influence in states like Washington, and this “revolving door” between the State anddrug companiescan’tcompromise the wellbeing of innocent citizens.

The law would entail a two-year “slowing down” span on ex-officials from the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the DEA, preventing them from supporting pharmaceutical companies with “lobbying efforts”.

The bill further defines “lobbying contact” asparticipating in activities like strategy sessions andhas a cap on the number of issues pharmaceutical industry executives can take partin if they become part of the federal government.

Time and again, we’ve seen several corporations hire federal staff from the government, and industry executivesget to top ranks in the government. In fact, representatives of the pharmaceutical industry stated that they depend largely on the skills of ex-federal officials to manage the complex nature of their field and help them abide by the complex drug regulations.

Another interesting restraint of the bill is a lifetime veto on taking part “in person and substantially” on a “specific matter” that the officer had been involved with while working for the United States Federal Government. This regulation has been put in place to avoidpossible conflicts of interest.

The proposed lawcomes after a Washington Post, famous as“60 Minutes” investigation into the impact of the opioid on Washington. It’s perplexing how firmsbehind the production and distribution ofhighly addictive painkillers have hired many top officials from DEA, most of them from divisions thatregulated the same companies they currently work for.

 

This practice began a decade ago when DEA investigators initiated a crack down on major drug companies thatallegedly failed to accountfor strangely large orders of pain relievers, many of which landed inthe black market. Ever since, pharmaceutical companies and their representing law firms have at one time or another hirednot less than 46 DEA officers — 32taken into servicedirectly from the government agency’s division that controls the corporation.

 

But thanks to this legislation, things may better for the public if it passes.“The public needs to have trust that the FDA and DEA are here to serve their interests and not that of Washington’s bigwigs,” saidBaldwin.

Author Bio

Electronic payments expert, Blair Thomas, co-founded eMerchantBroker in 2010. His passions include writing/producing music, and travel. eMerchantBroker is America’s No.1 Nutraceutical Merchant Account Providerserving both traditional and high-risk merchants.

 

 

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